Sunday, August 21, 2016

How do SJWs resolve their contradictions about Swedish rape statistics?

After writing Debunking the myth of an immigrant/Muslim rape crisis in Sweden—and one of its promoters, Ingrid Carlqvis, I realized someone (not me!) could write about the contradictory claims SJWs make regarding Swedish statistics and laws:

1. They're misleading: Sweden is not suffering from a Muslim rape crisis.
2. They're accurate: they prove we live in a rape culture, and Julian Assange must be guilty because two women went together to the police, who took the charge seriously.

To be clear, I think the statistics are useful when they're broken down further than they are by the people who believe Sweden's suffering from a rape crisis, and I believe all charges of sexual abuse should be treated seriously so long as everyone remembers the importance of the presumption of innocence.

Alas, both of those positions call for understanding that the world is complex. The greatest failure of the internet's SJWs is their desire to divide us all into the saved and the damned.

Friday, August 19, 2016

N. K. Jemisin thinks most of fandom is racist

I either missed this or didn't pay attention to it earlier, but now it seems to be a meme with the anti-sjws, so I thought I should document it. In Things People Need to Understand, issue 223.2 | Epiphany 2.0, Jemisin said,
After I read that book I realized two things: a) that Heinlein was racist as *fuck*, and b) most of science fiction fandom was too.
I haven't read any Heinlein in decades, and I remember being troubled by Farnham's Freehold when I read it at the age of 14 or so. Was it racist, or was it exploring the ramifications of racism by creating a racist society that was the reverse of the US's during the civil rights era? I would have to read it again to give a definitive answer. I ended up giving Heinlein the benefit of the doubt because he was one of the first SF writers to write a very popular novel with a character who has dark skin and a non-Anglo name: Starship Troopers is told from the point of view of Juan Rico, a Filipino,

But to understand that, you have to read critically, which identitarians don't.

As for the notion that most of fandom is racist, Jemisin believes or believed in Critical Race Theory, which posits that all white people are racist because they grew up in a racist society. CRTers make that claim less often now because studies like Project Implicit show it's nonsense, but having the facts against them has never made true believers change their minds. Whether Jemisin still thinks most of fandom is racist, I don't know. Someone should ask her.

It's possible she has had a wake-up call, as Malcolm X did. One of many things he said that I love him for:
"I totally reject Elijah Muhammad's racist philosophy, which he has labeled 'Islam' only to fool and misuse gullible people as he fooled and misused me. But I blame only myself, and no one else for the fool that I was, and the harm that my evangelical foolishness on his behalf has done to others." —Malcolm X
ETA: The Man Who Changed Middle-Class Feminism, or Derrick Bell and Critical Race Theory, Where Racism and Anti-Racism Intersect 

Sunday, August 14, 2016

Karl Marx on working-class racism: English vs Irish, White vs Black

Every industrial and commercial centre in England now possesses a working class divided into two hostile camps, English proletarians and Irish proletarians. The ordinary English worker hates the Irish worker as a competitor who lowers his standard of life….He cherishes religious, social, and national prejudices against the Irish worker. His attitude towards [Irish workers] is much the same as that of the ‘poor whites’ to the Negroes in the former slave states of the U.S.A…..This antagonism is artificially kept alive and intensified by the press, the pulpit, the comic papers, in short, by all the means at the disposal of the ruling classes. This antagonism is the secret of the impotence of the…working class, despite its organisation. It is the secret by which the capitalist class maintains its power. And the latter is quite aware of this.

Saturday, August 13, 2016

The difference between sea-lioning and calling-out

"Its 'sea lioning' when it's someone you don't agree with and 'calling out' when you do." —James 'Grim' Desborough

There is one important difference: A sea lion must be polite, while a caller-out must be filled with (self-)righteous fury.